Vape Detectors Might Be Coming To School Bathrooms

Vape Detectors Might Be Coming To School Bathrooms


It’s been a couple generations now since people were talking (or singing) about smoking in school bathrooms. But, for the brief window of the last few years, new vaping technology has allowed mischievous teens to inhale all the tobacco juice and hash oil they could handle in a school bathroom, without leaving too much of a trace behind them before they get back to class.

One school in Chicago, however, may soon put an end to the party by installing vapor detectors in its bathrooms and harshening penalties for those caught vaping on campus. Administrators of the New Trier high School announced during a presentation recently that they are considering new courses of action to fight student vaping, according to The Chicago Tribune.

One possible disciplinary measure for students caught with either weed vape pens or e-cigs would be to allow local police to issue what the Tribune calls “non-criminal village tickets.” Apparently, that’s what currently happens to students “being found with marijuana or other THC-containing materials” at the school.

So, police don’t even issue real criminal tickets for illegal cannabis possession on campus? What kind of magical school is this?

E-cigarette discipline cases have been on the rise at the school in recent years. In the 2015-2016 school year, there were 11 cases involving e-cigarettes. Last year, that number was multiplied nearly seven times to a whopping 75 e-cig cases. This year, a little over halfway through the school year, the total is at 56 e-cig discipline cases.

Administrators say they’re also considering including the bodily effects of vaping in the school’s health curriculum.

The potential vape-curbing measures were discussed in this presentation concurrently with other ideas which could make New Trier a generally safer environment. What administrators term the “kinetic wellness program” which “handles student risk behaviors, such as binge-drinking, sexual assault, opioid use and vaping,” and “covers student physical, emotional and mental health education.”

Photo via Flickr user Vaping360