In Denver, a ballt measure which would have legalized psilocybin mushrooms lost by a slim margin of only 5,000 votes. Nearly half of voters, 48%, cast their ballot in favor of the measure.

Initiative 301 would have legalized the possession and use of magic mushrooms within Denver city limits and made history as the first U.S. city to do so.

“This is not over yet,” said Kevin Matthews, manager for the Decriminalize Denver campaign which was behind Initiative 301.

Though the measure failed to pass, many mushroom advocates like Matthews feel emboldened by the substantial support which mushrooms received from voters.

 “Right now this thing is a coast-to-coast movement.” Matthews told Leafly.

Indeed, there are other similar ballot initiatives in the works right now including a move to decriminalize psychedelics in Oakland, California, and a campaign to legalize magic mushrooms in Oregon next year.

Mushrooms are even getting support from some Republican lawmakers like Iowa state legislator Jeff Shipley, who has introduced two bills to legalize mushrooms in his own state and came to Denver to lend his support there as well. There may a ground swell for psychedelic, but he knows it’s not going happen first in his home state. “In Iowa, fuck no,” Shipley said.

That’s why many are looking to Denver to start the conversation. In 2005, the city became the first in the country to decriminalize cannabis, contributing to state legalization in 2012, which has started a chain reaction of legalization across the country. Perhaps the same could happen in the same place, bit this time with psychedelics.

Photo via Flickr user jmv

In Denver, a ballt measure which would have legalized psilocybin mushrooms lost by a slim margin of only 5,000 votes. Nearly half of voters, 48%, cast their ballot in favor of the measure.

Initiative 301 would have legalized the possession and use of magic mushrooms within Denver city limits and made history as the first U.S. city to do so.

“This is not over yet,” said Kevin Matthews, manager for the Decriminalize Denver campaign which was behind Initiative 301.

Though the measure failed to pass, many mushroom advocates like Matthews feel emboldened by the substantial support which mushrooms received from voters.

 “Right now this thing is a coast-to-coast movement.” Matthews told Leafly.

Indeed, there are other similar ballot initiatives in the works right now including a move to decriminalize psychedelics in Oakland, California, and a campaign to legalize magic mushrooms in Oregon next year.

Mushrooms are even getting support from some Republican lawmakers like Iowa state legislator Jeff Shipley, who has introduced two bills to legalize mushrooms in his own state and came to Denver to lend his support there as well. There may a ground swell for psychedelic, but he knows it’s not going happen first in his home state. “In Iowa, fuck no,” Shipley said.

That’s why many are looking to Denver to start the conversation. In 2005, the city became the first in the country to decriminalize cannabis, contributing to state legalization in 2012, which has started a chain reaction of legalization across the country. Perhaps the same could happen in the same place, bit this time with psychedelics.

Photo via Flickr user jmv

Natalie